Prayer Service for the end of the school year – Junior Infants to Second Class

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Prayer Service, Religion | Posted on May 5, 2015

School's out!
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Sheila Steele via Compfight

Oops … I had this post scheduled incorrectly,

so it ‘escaped’ prematurely.

End of Year Prayer Service

Good morning & welcome. 

We are all here today with

new friends and old friends

and all our kind teachers.

 

We know that Jesus is our friend too

and so we sing our first song;  

‘Jesus is our Friend’.

 

Now we will say the Sign of the Cross 

in the three ways we know how;

(In the name of the Father…

As Gaeilge … and finally;

God came down from heaven to earth,

to remind us to love people on this side and this side

and not to forget ourselves. Amen … )

 

Candle Prayer;

‘Chase away the darkness.

Fill the world with light,

be a little candle flame and shine out bright’.

 

Why do we light a candle?

To remind us that God our Father in Heaven is always with us.

 

Song; ‘This Little Light of Mine’

 

Now it is time to say GOOD MORNING

to God our Father in Heaven;

‘Father in Heaven, you love me…etc.’

 

I’ll try to please you Father.

That is not easy.

But if we are truly sorry in our hearts,

then God our Father in Heaven will always forgive us.

 

So let’s say SORRY to God

‘O my God I thank you for loving me.

I am sorry for all my sins, for not loving others and not loving you.

Help me to live like Jesus and not sin again.

Amen’.

 

Let’s sing a sorry song;

‘Forgive and Forget x2

Make up your quarrels, be friends.

Remember the King, when he cancelled the debt.

Be kind to each other.

Forgive and forget

 

Forgive and forget x2.

Show that you’re sorry, be friends.

So try to be brave when you’re sad and upset.

Cheer up and be happy.

Forgive and forget.

 

Yes today we are going to have

a special time together.

We are going to think about the time

we have spent together in school

 

We are going to think about the ways

we have grown and all that we have learned

 

We are going to thank God

for all the ways in which

we have helped each other

to grow,

to learn

and to play together every day.

 

And to do this we are going

to practise a song that we will sing;

‘Thank you God we love you.

Thank you God we pray.

Thank you God we love you.

Thank you day by day’.

 

First we will give thanks to God

for the ways we have grown;

Our hands have grown,

our feet have grown.

Our whole body has grown.

We are getting taller all the time.

We are getting stronger all the time.

 

Sing; ‘Thank you God we love you.

Thank you God we pray.

Thank you God we love you.

Thank you day by day’.

 

Let’s also give thanks to God

for all that we have learned.

We can sing;

‘Monday morning off to school I go’ etc.

 

We can play lots of different games;

We learned rhymes like; 

Two Little Dicky Birds or Incy, Wincy Spider.

 

We know our numbers

Altogether;

‘I’ll show you one

I’ll show you two etc. to ten’.

 

We know how to read some words

Thank… you… God…

 

We can write some words.

Now take your magic finger and write

T-h-a-n-k… y-o-u… G-o-d…

 

Yes for all we have learned let’s all sing;

‘Thank you God we love you.

Thank you God we pray….’

 

Now let us think of all the people

who help us to grow and to learn and play.

For all the people that help us especially;

 

For our family

For our brothers and sisters

For our teachers.

 

Sing; ‘Thank you God we love you

Thank you God we pray

Thank you God we love you

Thank you day by day’.

 

So we are going to say thanks to God and sing;

‘Mr. Cow …how do you, say to the Lord, ‘I love you’?’

 

Lord God, Thank you for this year.

Thank you for all the growing we have done

and the learning we have done

and the people who have helped us.

Thank you for all our teachers.

 

To finish, let’s sing out the Good News;

God is every where;

‘If I Go Climbing …’

Prayer Service for the Month of May

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Prayer Service, Religion | Posted on May 1, 2015

Virgin and Child
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Lawrence OP via Compfight

Good morning & welcome to this

Prayer Service for May.

May is the month when we remember

how much Mary our mother in heaven loves us.

 

Sign of the Cross x3

Let us bless ourselves in the three ways

we know how:

- In the name of the Father…

- As Gaeilge

- God came down from heaven to earth

To remind us to love people on this side

and this side

and not to forget ourselves,

Amen

 

Candle Prayer; ‘Chase away the darkness.

Fill the world with light,

be a little candle flame and shine out bright’.

 

Why do we light a candle?

To remind us that God our Father in Heaven is always with us.

 

Song; If I go climbing … on the highest mountain

rowing … on the widest river

swimming … to the bottom of the ocean

driving … far away flying …

on the biggest aeroplane sleeping … on the darkest night

 

Mary, our mother in heaven is always with us too.

She is a very special person.

She was chosen by God to be the mother of His Son, Jesus.

Mary is our ‘mother’ too because Jesus shared her with us.

She loves us just like our own Mums love us.

 

Now it is time for us to say sorry.

If we are truly sorry in our hearts,

then God our Father in Heaven will always forgive us.

 

So let’s say our Sorry Prayer

O my God I thank you for loving me.

I am sorry for all my sins, for not loving others and not loving you.

Help me to live like Jesus and not sin again.

Amen

 

Song; Forgive and forget

 

And now it is time for us to say A Thank You to God

God our Father I come to say, thank you for your love today.

Thank you for my family and all the friends you give to me.

Guard me in the dark of night and in the morning, please send your light.

Amen.

 

What do Mums do?

Cook, clean, work at home, go to work, shop, care for you. The list is almost endless.

Did Mary our mother in heaven do such things? Yes of course…

Mothers are much more than people who look after us and do all this work!

They fill our lives with love

They make us laugh and smile

They listen to us and answer our questions

They have time for us

They make us feel wanted.

So we should thank Mums too.

 

Thank you Song; If I were a butterfly

 

Mary did all these things for her little boy, Jesus

Mums do all these things for us.

And when children are bold …

do Mums and Dads stop loving their children?

No. Mums and Dads don’t like the bold things

children sometimes do,

but they ALWAYS love their children.

 

Mary our mother in heaven may not like

the things we do sometimes,

but she ALWAYS loves us.

 

God our Father in heaven may not like

the things we do sometimes

but He ALWAYS loves us.

 

I have a story here about a Mother and  her children.

They loved her and she loved them very much.

This story is called ‘Owl Babies’ by Martin Waddell

and here it is on Vimeo:

 

Before we sing our final hymn

we have one last prayer:

Repeat after me;

Mary our mother tells us

Do not be afraid,

God will always love you

Whatever you have done

God will always love you

As a father loves his child

He will always love you

Come back to home and know

God’s love last forever

 

Finish with one of the hymns about Mary that the children

are familiar with.

That Time of Year Again: Information For Parents about Standardized Tests

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Standardized Tests | Posted on April 26, 2015

 

 5843577306

‘A test only measures what the test asks’

 

A parent generally shouldn’t be overly concerned

about test results unless the teacher is.

The teacher looks at the result in conjunction

with how the child has succeeded

at their schoolwork

over a full year

and decide if it reflects reality or not.

 

Parents can do this too.

Looking back over completed workbooks and copybooks

may show that your child can be inconsistent.

Some days children may do excellent work

and present their work beautifully

and on another they may not.

This is not unusual.

Children after all are children!

We wouldn’t have them any other way.

 

Some background information on standardized tests.

How do teachers prepare children for the test?

It is accepted as more than ‘good practice’

not to ‘teach to the test’.

In fact it is vital not to ‘teach to the test’

as doing so invalidates the test.

 

We teach the Maths and English curriculum

as laid down in the Irish curriculum.

We do not prepare the children

for the specific questions in the standardized tests.

If we did that would negate the ‘standardized’ aspect of them

and the results wouldn’t be authentic.

 

These results just show how a child performed

in one test with a set of questions

that they are not prepared for in any way,

The format may be unfamiliar.

 

Other aspects to consider

The test may be given in 2nd class

or in the Autumn Term of 3rd.

For that reason, some of the sums included

by the designers of this test

are from the 3rd class curriculum.

 

So this content,

included towards the end of the test

will be unfamiliar to the students.

Some children will approach these more difficult questions

as problems to be solved and

with a ‘can do’ attitude may get some right.

 

Others can be somewhat perturbed by their unfamiliarity

and say ‘Teacher you never taught us how to do this!’

 

The timing of the tests

The English or Maths tests are completed in a day.

We are advised not to ‘test’ on a Monday or a Friday

or on a day after an event like ‘Sports Day’

or the day of the School Tour.

 

Children find the standardized tests challenging.

At 2nd class, one section of the English test

is 40 minutes long

and the Maths test can take over an hour.

 

That’s a long time for a 7 or 8 year old to sit quietly,

- work independently,

- concentrate

- and to remain motivated.

 

While the teacher is there to supervise

and ‘support’ the children,

the examinees do not get help

or advice from the teacher.

 

Exams by their very nature,

are all too often

a test of stamina 

as much as a test of knowledge and abilities.

 

Exam Skills

Then there are ‘exam skills’.

These are still very much developing in Second Class.

Time management is one of these skills.

 

It is considered ‘good practice’

that the teacher moves around the classroom

during the test.

So, for example, if a child gets ‘stuck’

on one question they can be advised

to ‘leave it until later and move on’.

 

On the other hand some children

are inclined to rush

and do not understand the

importance of checking back over their work.

 

The standardized test results

are a ‘snapshot’ on the day.

Perhaps a child was tired or distracted.

Maybe he or she didn’t realise the significance

of the test and so didn’t do their best.

 

Teachers walk a tightrope between

reminding the children to do their best yet

not cause children unnecessary worry.

 

An analysis of errors made

It is useful for the teacher to analyse

why mistakes were made.

particularly in the Sigma T Maths Test.

 

The children do the first two pages with direction from the teacher.

They are then given up to an hour to complete over forty questions.

Some children come up very quickly to say

they have ‘finished’ the paper.

Still in 2nd class some children equate doing best with finishing first.

 

Coming up after even twenty minutes

means that a child has given less than 30 seconds to

- reading a question,

- deciding what needs to be done,

- arriving at an answer

- and checking it is correct.

 

Simple mistakes can be made by those in a hurry.

For example;

at one point the students are asked to count money.

Instead they are inclined to count

the number of coins on the page.

 

Many of the sums had graphics to help the children.

Children in a hurry, miscount and mix up signs;

adding instead of subtracting for example.

 

STen Scores

In the end of the year reports,

results will be given in the form of STen scores.

(A system of scoring from 1-10)

 

Just a few simple mistakes like those described

and a child can drop a STen

Sometimes it can be a case of two or three

more correct answers and a Sten would go up.

 

If the child got a STen of 5 (average) last year

and a STen of 4 (below average) this year,

it can seem like the child

is beginning to have difficulties

whereas the reality is,

if they hadn’t made two or three avoidable errors

like those described,

they would still be at a 5.

 

Remember too, your child may be tired

after a morning of testing.

 
7183436269_7791c83fbd_z
‘We Teach Individuals’ by Krissy.Venosdale, on Flickr

Differences between the USA and Ireland: Distances and Area.

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Blogging Buddies, The World Around Us | Posted on April 24, 2015

To our Blogging Buddies,

Mrs. Todd’s class The Roadrunners

 

We can see where North Carolina is.

Can you see us?
2013-09-12 ThankingCreative Commons License

Denise Krebs via Compfight

The main thing is we are so much smaller than you are.

The US is 9,826,675 sq km sq kms.

Ireland is 81,638 sq kms.

Ireland would fit in the United States 120 times

with room to spare.

 

If North Carolina is 139,390 km² in area,

Ireland would easily fit into North Carolina

with even more room to spare.

 

At its longest from Antrim down to Cork, Ireland is 486km.

At its widest from County Down across to Mayo, it is 167km.

 

So we are small, but we say

‘the best goods come in small parcels.’

169/366 Father's Day Nuwandalice via Compfight

A Tourist Attraction in Wicklow: Powercourt Waterfall.

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Geography, The World Around Us | Posted on April 24, 2015

Mrs. Todd’s Roadrunners from North Carolina wrote a great post about a tourist attraction in their part of the world. It is called Emerald Hollow Mines. It sounds magical. You can go on a real treasure hunt digging and panning for precious stones. You can read about it here.

Wicklow county where we live, had mining from the Bronze Age. There were copper, lead, sulphur, iron, gold, silver and zinc mines. Up to 1960 the most mining in Ireland was happening in Wicklow. Now there is no mining because it is not profitable.

Powerscourt Waterfall Dave Gunn via Compfight

The tourist attraction we are going to write about is also geographical. It is Ireland’s tallest waterfall, Powerscourt Waterfall in County Wicklow. The water falls 106 metres. It would take us 25 minutes to get from school to the waterfall.

We love this story about the waterfall. In August 1821, the King of England, King George the Fourth visited Powerscourt. The owner of Powerscourt, the 5th Viscount wanted to impressed the kind so he had a dam put up at the top of the waterfall so that a great torrent of water could be released while he and the king stood below.

Powerscourt WaterfallCreative Commons License Matt McGee via Compfight

Luckily the king was having such a great time at the party in Powerscourt they never got to the waterfall because later when the water was released, the torrent washed the bridge where they would have been standing away.

Powerscourt WaterfallCreative Commons License

Greg Bailey via Compfight

Powerscourt WaterfallCreative Commons License

Greg Bailey via Compfight

You can read more about other tourist attractions

we think you should see here.

A Short History of Greystones

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in #BeautifulGreystones, Blogging Buddies, History Around Us, History Projects | Posted on April 23, 2015

 

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Creative Commons License Photo Credit: long may she rain ☂ via Compfight

History of Greystones

Long ago no one lived in Greystones.

It was too wild and wind swept.

Then King Heremon built a rath

Sheep of Kings
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: mollydot via Compfight

in a more sheltered spot to the north of Greystones.

This was at Rathdown.

This was 500 BC.

 Pestle and mortar - Choquequirao - PeruCreative Commons License Mark Rowland via Compfight

Early farmers lived at Rathdown too

By the Middle Ages there were 500 people living at Rathdown.

DSC_2425 Joachim S. Müller via Compfight

The Vikings came by boat and by land from Dublin.

Viking swords
Photo Credit: Arild Nybø via Compfight

Greystones is in County Wicklow.

Wicklow means ‘Viking Meadow’.

85 Haithabu Herbstmesse WMH 02-11-2014 Kai-Erik via Compfight.

Vikings were fierce warriors from the North of Europe.

Later the Normans lived at the castle.

They were skilled soldiers from the North of France.

William's silhouette
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Matthijs via Compfight

 

In 1301, the wild, Wicklow tribes,

the O’Tooles and the O’Byrnes burnt down the castle.

They came on foot and horseback.

Greystones (Na Clocha Liatha in Irish) is a coastal town in County WicklowCreative Commons License William Murphy via Compfight

In 1800 no one was living at Greystones.  

Described as a ‘wild headland’,

English speaking sailors

sailing on the Irish Sea

used call the area ‘the grey stones’

because of the grey rocks.

In 1825, there were 7 fishing families living there.

Noose Mike Dean via Compfight

The arrival of the railway changed all that.

Now we are a town in the ‘commuter belt’.

People live in Greystones

and commute by train to Dublin city to work.

Lots of tourists come and visit us on the train.

It is a good place to visit and a GREAT place to live.

 

204 of 365 - …upon the mountains like a flame

Fearghal via Compfight

 

 

 

Food: Difference between American English and how we speak English in Ireland.

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Blogging Buddies, Language | Posted on April 23, 2015

Mrs. Todd’s Class ‘The Roadrunners’

are from North Carolina in the USA.

They have a blog called

‘Going Global as Rocky River’. 

They are learning about other countries

and other cultures.

 

Hi there Roadrunners,

If any of you were coming to visit us here in Ireland,

the different way

we use English might make things a bit confusing.

If you asked for a scone this is what we would give you:

Scone eltpics via Compfight

We would serve it with jam and cream.

By jam we mean jelly.

raspberry jam Christa via Compfight

Mmm, this looks like raspberry.

If you asked for jelly, we would give you this;

Jelly poppet with a camera via Compfight

We call these crisps

Builders Breakfast Edward Kimber via Compfight

Though we wouldn’t eat them with a knife and fork,

we might put them in a sandwich.

We call these chips:

Large Chips - Zest Wraps QV AUD4Creative Commons License Alpha via Compfight

unless we are in McDonald’s, in which case

we call them ‘french fries’.

We think it is interesting, that

although both the Irish

and the Americans speak English,

they speak if differently.

 

Click on this link if you want to read more

about the food we eat in Ireland.

Local History: Three castles from Greystones long ago.

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in History Around Us, History Projects | Posted on April 23, 2015

Mrs. Todd’s Class ‘The Roadrunners’

are from North Carolina in the USA.

They have a blog called

‘Going Global as Rocky River’. 

 

Click here to see their learning about castles.

 

They said: 

‘We know there are special castles out there

so let us hear from you…’

 

So here is what we know about the castles in our local area:

 

There used be three castles in Greystones,

where we live, that we are sure of.

 

Now two are in ruins and there some evidence

that the third castle once existed.

 

Let us tell you about our castles.

1. The first one is Rathdown Castle

 

The very first visitors to Greystones,

came during the Stone Age.

They didn’t stay where our town is today,

but instead they stayed at a place now called Rathdown,

just to the north.

North Circle stone

 Jim Champion via Compfight

We think these early settlers

chose to live north of Greystones because

– it was more sheltered.

– There were the advantages of living

beside the sea and

– having a fresh water spring nearby.

– Woodland birds and animals

could have been a source of food.

DSCF2126 Urban_Mongoose via Compfight

Unlike ourselves, these early residents

couldn’t afford to be too choosy.

 

In the Bronze age King Heremon came

and built a fortification

in this sheltered spot in 1699BC.

DSC_2425 Joachim S. Müller via Compfight

Rath means fort in Irish.

This is where the area of Rathdown gets its name.

 

Many hundreds of years later The Normans built

a proper castle at Rathdown.

TRIM CASTLE - COUNTY MEATH, IRELANDCreative Commons License William Murphy via Compfight

This isn’t THE castle but this is what

it probably looked like as it was a Norman castle.

 

The wild Wicklow tribes, the O’Byrnes and O’Tooles

burnt down the castle in 1301.

2013 Thanksgiving Day Bonfire in Hull Jeff Cutler via Compfight

However it was rebuilt again from 1308

by other Norman families.

 

In 1534, a castle,

20 houses,

a watermill

and a creek were recorded at Rathdown.

 

In the 19th century a crazy landowner

started dismantling the castle

to make walls and sheds on his farm.

Textures, Orkney May 2010 Cole Henley via Compfight

His name was Colonel Tarrant

and we feel he has a lot to answer for,

as he destroyed our heritage.

 

Finally the last stones of the castle were used

to make a railway bridge in the 1850s.

An uneven skylineCreative Commons License Broo_am (Andy B) via Compfight

Aerial photographs of the fields

where the castle once stood show

outlines of ancient fields, houses, paths and roads.

 

2. Kindlestown Castle:

About fifty years before Rathdown Castle was built,

Kindlestown Castle was built

sometime around 1225.

 

In 1377 the wild O’Byrnes captured the castle.

It was taken back and in 1402

the O’Byrnes tried to capture the castle again

but were defeated.

 

3. Killincarrig Castle

Killincarrig Castle was a manor house

built slightly later again, about 1620.

This manor seemed a popular place

for both military and rebels to stay over the centuries.

 

During the Eleven Years War (1641-1653)

the castle became a stronghold

by the Catholic Confederates.

Cromwell

MacDara Conroy via Compfight

After that in 1649, Oliver Cromwell

an English leader. 

He was considered to be a hero in England,

but a villain in Ireland, responsible for 

great loss of life in Ireland.

Kento Friesian Stallion Friese. via Compfight

He spent a night in Killincarrig Castle.

He posted some troops there

while he went south in search of his horse

which had been stolen by the Irish rebels.

The Battle - Battle of Wisby 1361 Lars Lundqvist via Compfight 

Later in history, during the 1798 rebellion,

the Irish rebels hid there after to avoid getting caught!

Some of us have visited this ruin.

It is in a lady’s back garden and is a protected structure.

rust means peace brka via Compfight 

Evidence of Killincarrig’s past has been found

such as old muskets, pistol balls, gunpowder measures

and other such equipment which were found in

and around the castle.

A019-00608 Andrew_Writer via Compfight

We think we are lucky to live in a place

that has such a rich history.

However we are glad that all the war

and fighting are over.

Hurrah for #DisneyInfinity and Code.org

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Coding | Posted on April 7, 2015

This will be a wonderful incentive

to settle back into school next week.

We REALLY enjoyed coding on Code.org

with Anna and Elsa from ‘Frozen’

earlier in the year and now

we get to code with Hiro and Baymax

from Disney’s Big Hero 6.

Schooldays ARE the happiest days of your life!

Click HERE to learn.

For other useful resources from Made With Code.com

click here.

Celebrating Past Pupil Success: Vincent Forsyth – Poet

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Past Pupil Success, Poetry | Posted on March 29, 2015

Occasionally on our blog we write about past pupils of St. Brigid’s, Greystones. There is a great variety in the successes of our past pupils.

Last year we told you about  Emily’s Green Fingers and her contribution to the Greystones community. 

Before that we wrote about Harry who is having great success musically. We called that post ‘Mighty Oaks from Little Acorns grow’ . 

We also told you about a girl called Caroline Dwyer Hickey who became a much loved teacher, remembered by her family with the gift of The Greystones Bear to this seaside town.

From an original story that Emer Nolan composed for ‘Write A Book’, her Mum, Sineaid Doyle has written a book. Titled ‘Mary Wolftide’, it is now available on Kindle.

Now to this ‘Hall of Fame’ we add poet Vincent Forsyth. Vinnie Forsyth was in Junior Infants with us in the early 2000s. He moved with his family to Wexford in 2006.

Vincent is in 5th Year now in Enniscorthy and is writing poetry. Having left our school ten years ago, we can take no credit for Vincent’s success but we really wanted to know what made him a poet!

Vincent

We wrote to Vincent to tell him that we thought his poetry was great. We had some questions for him and this is what he told us:

‘I started writing poetry because I realized there is so much that a person can express but they don’t and I always liked English and I was told I had a good way with words, and that it could bring me far.

I had done small bits when I first moved from Greystones but that was just before secondary, and I didn’t realize how easy it would be to get out there and start my own page to post my writing. 

In secondary, I began writing as there were quite a few clubs that I wanted to join, such as the creative writing group and that was sort of the kick start of it all.

With the creative writing group I’ve met a few Irish poets such as Colm Keegan, John W. Sexton and Garry Mc Carthy. They were really interesting to meet and it was inspiring their love for words. It was also comforting that they were as crazy as me! 

I love reading, but as I am in 5th year, I’m trying to study more, so I don’t get to indulge in my books like I would want to. My advice for younger people is to just get out and do it.

Find something you are passionate about and write. Even if you need a helping help to get to started, don’t be afraid to ask.

You ask me about ambitions for the future, that’s a tough question. I’d like to do so much, but will I ever have time to do it all? I would love to maybe going into lyric writing as of late I have been doing so much of it, and maybe some sort of performance art. 

Favorite poet? There is so many! I really like the poet I’m studying now, and that is Sylvia Plath, and maybe Elizabeth Bishop. 

Oh and as an added note about the creative writing, I received an award for speaking in the Nation Library Dublin for the Writing Reading and Performance Poetry Initiative abbreviated WRaPPAround, and within school I received Best Junior Writer award also. 

I could possibly go on for years about writing. It’s such a great thing to know and once you have your way with words, it’s hard to lose it.

The last thing I shall say is that I have this super awesome new book of writing which will be released soon! Exciting stuff.’

Vinnie has self published eight books of poetry online. One of his approaches to to ask people to submit a word or a sentence and he writes a poem based on that. Here is a powerful poem Vincent wrote called:

The Underdog

 Poem2

We felt we knew what he was talking about.

We also REALLY like this one: ‘One Step at a Time’ 

If you want to read more of Vincent’s poetry, click on this link to see his most recent book ‘A Lone Declaration’.

Many thanks to Vincent for answering our questions, allowing us to share his work and his advice to us about writing. We wish him every success and will follow his career with interest.

Taa-dah… ‘Ms. Breen and the Prince; A Fairytale for Today’

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Art Matters | Posted on March 27, 2015

Well done to Ms. Kenny’s class.

They painted some really wonderful 

pictures of Ms. Breen and the Prince.

We wish Ms. Breen and

her husband to be,

a very happy day and

a wonderful life together.

Poetry; Connections – Spring Poems by John Foster & ee cummings

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Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Comprehension: Making Connections, Poetry, The World Around Us | Posted on March 19, 2015

We are ‘making connections’ again -

this time, between poems.

Poems about Spring.

The Three Musketeers!
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Tony Hammond via Compfight

It’s Spring by John Foster

 

It’s spring

And the garden is changing its clothes,

Putting away

Its dark winter suits,

Its dull scarves

And drab brown overcoats.

 

Now, it wraps itself in green shoots,

Slips on blouses

Sleeved with pink and white blossom,

Pulls on skirts of daffodil and primrose,

Snowdrops socks and purple crocus shoes,

Then dances in the sunlight.

 “Freedom is for honest people. No man who is not himself honest can be free – he is his own trap.”
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: urbancitylife via Compfight

In Just-                     by ee cummings

 

in Just-

spring when the world is mud-

luscious the little

lame balloonman

whistles far and wee

and eddieandbill come

running from marbles and

piracies and it’s

spring

when the world is puddle-wonderful

the queer

old balloonman whistles

far and wee

and bettyandisbel come dancing

from hop-scotch and jump-rope and

it’s

spring

and

the

goat-footed

balloonMan whistles

far

and

wee

Liúireach Phádraig

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Dánta, Gaeilge, Paidir, St.Patrick | Posted on March 17, 2015

Jesus with little one
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: freestone wilson via Compfight

Críost liom, Críost romham, Críost i mo dhiaidh.

Críost ionam, Críost fúm, Críost os mo chionn,

Críost ar mo láimh dheis, Críost ar mo láimh chlé,

Críost ar mo shuí, Críost ar mo luí, Críost ar m’éirí,

Críost i gcroí gach duine a smaoiníonn orm,

Críost i mbéal gach duine a labhrann liom,

Críost i ngach súil a fhéachann orm,

Críost i ngach cluas a éisteann liom.

St Patrick (Kempe)
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Lawrence OP via Compfight

UPDATE Quotable Quote: ‘Writing come from Reading…’ Annie Proulx

2

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in A Local Hero, Art: Poster making, Quotable Quote, Writing Prompt | Posted on March 8, 2015

HARK!

Our post received a comment from Mrs. S that made us think!

She said:

‘Wow, What a great quote. It definitely shows how reading and writing are intertwined and both benefit from putting effort into the other.

I like how it refers to the shape of a story and the sentences within it. What do you picture in your mind when you read those words?

Mrs S’

5/6 Clark/Smith from Tasmania

IMG_0751

We replied:

‘We love designing posters with canva.comWe are glad you liked our quote. We kept the poster simple because it was a busy one with a lot of words.

Our poster ties in with something our teacher told us that she heard from a local author and film maker.

Simon Fitzmaurice is a Dad in our school. He wrote a wonderful script for our Christmas pageant. Some years ago Simon started to write a movie. It is called ‘My Name is Emily’. He began writing it with a pen or typing on a keyboard. Because Simon has motor neuron disease he finished it using a special “eye gaze” computer that allows him to type by looking at letters on a screen.

When he was fundraising to make the movie, teacher asked him a question on a Reddit ‘Question and Answer’. She asked him what advice would you give to young writers and Simon said, in order to become a good writer you have to write.

So now we have the following picture in our mind when we read those words: A young person reading many books and trying their hand at reading. Reading will make us better writers according to Annie Proulx and writing will make us better writers according to Simon Fitzmaurice.

Thank you for asking us a question that made us think!

Since that time Simon has published a book called: ‘It’s Not Yet Dark’. He has shot the movie and is editing it. Keep an eye out for it. It is called ‘My Name Is Emily’.’

We LOVE getting comments on our blog. Thank you :)

#stubc15: Great opportunity for class & student bloggers: Student Blogging Challenge begins early March 2015. #edchatie

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in A Challenge, Blogging, Blogging Buddies, Blogging Skills | Posted on February 15, 2015

BeFunky_Underpainting_242.jpg

 

Participating in the the biannual

Student Blogging Challenge

is an excellent opportunity

for individual students and classes who blog,

to learn new blogging skills,

to develop their blog

and make contact with students and schools

all over the globe.

 

It is conducted over ten weeks

in September and March of each year.

The next challenge is in early March.

Here are the Frequently Asked Questions

about the challenge.

 

We can’t recommend it highly enough.

Our own experience was

that as a result of participating

in the Student Blogging Challenge

we made contact with many schools

from all over USA, Canada, UK, Australia and New Zealand

and we learnt many new blogging skills.

 

Here is a flipboard of the work that was posted globally

during the challenge this time last year.

BeFunky_Underpainting_242.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We found it was a wonderful opportunity

and we really ‘took off’ as a result of participating

in the ‘Student Blogging Challenge’.

Why not try it?

You have everything to gain

and nothing to lose !

Here are the details of how to register.

Pop Art Creations

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Art Matters | Posted on February 13, 2015

Using the class camera and photo editing tools

on BeFunky.com 

sixth class students created Pop Art.

PopArt.jpg

We are happy with the results

but would like to experiment some more.

ALEXCOLLAGE3.jpg

#BeautifulGreystones – We live in a beautiful place: Greystones, County Wicklow, Ireland

2

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in #BeautifulGreystones, Blogging Buddies, The World Around Us | Posted on February 6, 2015

bray to greystonesCreative Commons License
Rach via Compfight

 

We go to school in St. Brigid’s National School

in Greystones, County Wicklow in Ireland.

Most of us live nearby.

We love living in Greystones.

It is a good community where people look out for each other.

 

Visitors to our blog often ask what Greystones is like.

Take a look at this video created

by a talented young photographer Seán Daly

and you will see what a beautiful part of the world we live in;

an hour away from our capital city of Dublin,

beside the sea and near the Wicklow hills.

February …

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Language Development - Oral, Poetry, The Seasons, Writing Prompt | Posted on February 2, 2015

February brings the rain,

Thaws the frozen lake again.

Sign of spring 2
Photo Credit: James Jordan via Compfight

from ‘The Garden Year’ by Sarah Coleridge

A Prayer Service for Lent

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Lent, Prayer Service, Religion | Posted on February 1, 2015

Lent begins on Ash Wednesday.

This year Ash Wednesday is on 18th February.

Lent
Photo Credit: jezobeljones via Compfight

Good morning & welcome to this prayer service for Lent.

Jesus came to bring Good News

to help us to know God Our Father’s love for us.

Jesus loves us.

Jesus loves us so much He was prepared to give up his own life.

That is GREAT love.

We are going to sing a song about Jesus our brother and our friend.

Song: Jesus I love you and I know that you love me too.

Now we are going to bless ourselves,

the three ways we know how:

Sign of the Cross x3

1. In the name of the Father…

2. As Gaeilge

3. The special way we say it here:

God came down from heaven to earth,

To remind us to love everyone on this side

and this side

And not to forget ourselves.

Amen

Candle Prayer; ‘Chase away the darkness.

Fill the world with light,

be a little candle flame and shine out bright’.

Song; This little light of mine

Why do we light a candle?

To remind us God our Father in Heaven is always with us.

We know a song about that…

If I go climbing…

And it is time to say Good Morning to our Father in Heaven.

Father in Heaven, you love me.

You are with me night and day.

I want to love you always

in all I do and say.

I’ll try to praise you Father,

Please help me during the day.

Amen

I’ll try to please you Father.

That is not easy.

But if we are truly sorry in our hearts,

then our Father in Heaven will always forgive us.

So let’s say sorry to God

O my God I thank you for loving me.

I am sorry for all my sins,

for not loving others and not loving you.

Help me to live like Jesus and not sin again.

Amen

Let us ask God in song to forgive us

if there were times we have not shown love

and help us be good

Song: Forgive and Forget

Repeat after me…

Father in Heaven I give you this day,

All that I think & do & say.

Fill me with love & make me strong.

With you by my side I won’t go wrong

God our Father in Heaven will make us strong.

God our Father in Heaven is strong.

There’s nothing that he cannot do.

And now it is time to say thanks to God

God our Father I come to say,

thank you for your love today.

Thank you for my family

and all the friends you give to me.

Guard me in the dark of night

and in the morning, please send your light. Amen.

And now we are going to sing our thanks to God;

‘If I were a butterfly’

When we were saying our sorry prayer we said;

‘Help me to live like Jesus’.

Jesus is our brother,

our friend and our teacher

This time in the Church’s Year is Lent.

Lent is a time for getting ready for Easter.

At Easter we celebrate when Jesus came back to life.

Easter is a time when we celebrate New Life.

Spring is here now and it is a great time for New Life

Green buds appear on the trees

The spring flowers start to grow

Baby lambs are born

Frogspawn turn into ……………………..tadpoles.

Tadpoles turn into ………………………..frogs.

Caterpillars turn into ……………………butterflies

(Take out pot, potting compost and seeds.)

God through your goodness we have these little seeds to plant.

God we ask you to care for these flower seeds and help them to grow.

God with the work of our hands we have planted these seeds.

Keep these seeds safe.

Watch over them in the dark earth of the pot,

until they grow into beautiful flowers. Amen

Song: The Flowers of the Field

Now try this one; The little seeds are now fast asleep safe in the earth they lie

The children have covered them over and said little brown seeds goodbye

The seeds are asleep, but the sunshine and rain will help them wake up to new life again

New Life is Good News, so we are going to finish up with a happy song;

Final Hymn: I’ve got that Joy, joy, joy

Another Milestones: 50 Thousand Visitors to Our Blog :D

2

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Blogging Buddies | Posted on January 21, 2015

50 thousand

Today we reached a new milestone on this blog.

We now have had 50,000 visitors.

 

We really appreciate because

in our first year blogging 2011-12,

we had just 1,000 visitors.

In 2012-13 we had 14,000. 

Year beginning  Visitors   
30th August 2011-2012    1,000
30th August 2012-2013   14,000
30th August 2013-2014   24,000

 
 
 
 

 

Now we have had a total of 50,000 visitors.

 

Thank you for visiting,

and call back again soon.

St. Brigid’s Day: February 1st: ‘We Sing A Song To Brigid’

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Music: Song SInging, Religion | Posted on January 20, 2015

Stained Glass
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Adam Arroyo via Compfight

We sing a song to Brigid, 
Brigid brings the spring
Awakens all the fields and the flowers
And calls the birds to sing.
All were welcome at her door, 
no one was turned away.
She loved the poor,
the sick and the sore,
She helped them on their way.
She laid her cloak out on the ground
And watched it grow and grow,
In wells and streams and fields of green
St. Brigid’s blessings flow.

 
Lyrics from Alive-O (Veritas).
Written by Clare Maloney and Patrica Hegarty

Prayer Service for St. Brigid’s Day (February 1st) for Infant Classes – Third

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Prayer Service, Religion, Uncategorized | Posted on January 20, 2015

St. Brigid’s Day 1st February

Prayer Service for the Infant Classes -Third

 

St Brigid of Kildare
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Lawrence OP via Compfight

Good morning & welcome.

 

We are all here today in the school hall with new friends

and old friends and our kind teachers and helpers.

We know that Jesus is our friend too and so we sing our first song; 

*Hymn

 

Yes Jesus is our friend.

He has lots of friends.

Saints are very special friends of Jesus indeed.

 

Do you know any saints?

Lots of us are called after holy people in the bible

like Sarah or Hannah or Rebecca, Aaron, Stephen, Daniel.

 

Lots of people are called after saints like

Patrick, Kevin, James, and Elizabeth, Bernadette and Brigid.

 

Now it is a long time since there was any little girl called Brigid in the school,

but this year we are in luck and have a new girl here called Brigid.

 

Does anyone have a friend or a Mum or an Auntie or Granny called Brigid?

And of course our school is called St. Brigid’s.

 

A new month started today – what month is it.

Yes it is the 1st day of February.

The day many people say is the first day of Spring.

And it is St.Brigid’s Day!

 

So let us sing ‘We’ll sing a song to Brigid!’

Now we will say the Sign of the Cross

in the three ways we know how

(In the name of the Father… As Gaeilge …

and finally;

God came down from heaven to earth,

to remind us to love people

on this side and this side

and not to forget ourselves. Amen … )

 

Candle Prayer;

‘Chase away the darkness.

Fill the world with light,

be a little candle flame

and shine out bright’.

 

Why do we light a candle?

To remind us that God our Father in Heaven

is always with us.

 

*Song; This little light of mine

 

Now it is time to say GOOD MORNING

to God our Father in Heaven.

Father in Heaven, you love me,

You are with me night and day

I want to love you always,

in all I do and say.

I’ll try to please you Father,

Please help me during the day

Amen.

 

I’ll try to please you Father.

That is not easy.

But if we are truly sorry in our hearts,

then God our Father in Heaven will always forgive us.

 

So let’s say SORRY to God

O my God I thank you for loving me.

I am sorry for all my sins,

for not loving others and not loving you.

Help me to live like Jesus and not sin again.

Amen

 

Yes today celebrating St. Brigid’s Day.

She loved the poor, the sick and the old.

 

Because it is St. Brigid’s Day

Sister says there is to be no homework

for good children to celebrate :)

 

Now I know some of your teachers

have been talking to you about St. Brigid.

What do you know about St. Brigid?

 

Legend has it that when Brigid was born,

angels sang in the sky over the place she was born.

 

St. Brigid – father was a pagan chief.

He didn’t believe in God. Brigid’s mother was a servant

who knew about God and believed in God.

 

Brigid was born near Faughart,

a village a few miles north of Dundalk.

 

Brigid was minded by a foster mother

because her mother worked

in Connaught, far away from where Brigid lived

 

When Brigid was about your age,

she helped her foster mother around the house.

 

Any free time she had was spent in the nearby forest

with the wild animals living there.

 

Just like Saint Francis of Assisi,

she was very fond of animals.

Legends tell us she tamed a wild boar (pig)

and she loved nature and the beautiful world

God has made for us to live in:

 

*Hymn

 

She was very kind to the poor people

that called to the door

and was always giving away her father’s things.

 

When she was about twelve,  

Brigid was waiting outside

the King of Leinster’s fort

for her Dad when she met a poor man.

 

He was covered in rags and mud.

What do you think St. Brigid did?

Yes she just had to help him. 

 

There was nothing else in the chariot,

so she took her Dad’s sword

and gave it to the poor man.

How do you think her Dad felt about that?

 

He was furious.

Luckily the King of Leinster was there

and he believed in God like Brigid did

and understood why Brigid had done what she had done,

so the King gave her Dad an even better sword

and told her Dad to forgive her.

 

St. Brigid was told she couldn’t visit

her Mum in Connaught,

so do you know what she did?

Yes that’s right!

 

She visited her Mum in Connaught!

Her Mum had a job looking after

the druid’s cows at the druid’s farm.

 

*Time for a song

 

St Brigid worked with her Mum helping her,

making cheese and butter. 

 

And guess what happened

when poor people called to the door?

 

Yes, you are right,

she gave away food at the door.

 

How do you think the Druid felt about that?

 

Well a very surprising thing happened.

No matter how much food Brigid gave away

there always seemed to be more food there.

The Druid realised that

there was something special about Brigid,

so he tried to give her all his cows.

 

She said she didn’t want that.

What do you think she wanted.

Yes for her Mum to come home with her!

 

Brigid believed in God, Our Father in Heaven.

She saw God in everyone and in everything.

She saw God everywhere.

So this story has a happy ending.

Brigid’s family was back together again.

 

*Hymn

Now we are going to say a special prayer

to keep us and our families safe:

 

Repeat after me!

St. Brigid’s Blessing

May no fire, no flame burn us.

May no lake, no sea drown us

May no sword, no spear wound us.

May no king, no chief insult us.

May all the birds sing for us

May all the cattle low for us

May all the insects buzz for us

May the angels of God always protect us

 

And we are going to sing a song to Brigid, one last time!

@YollisClass; Thank you for visiting us in Ireland

0

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Blogging Buddies | Posted on January 14, 2015

We say, ‘Céad míle fáilte romhat!’

to visitors.

This means ‘A hundred thousand welcomes’ in Irish.
We would like to say Go raibh maith agat! (Thank you)
to Mrs. Yollis’ class who visited us here in
Greystones, in Wicklow in Ireland.
and especially Aryana, who left a great comment.

 

Ireland is sometimes called ‘The Emerald Isle’

and people say there are forty shades of green

in the country side. We have never counted,

but we think there might be more. 

 

Here in Greystones, we live close to the

Little Sugar Loaf Mountain.

 

The Three Trout River is our nearest river

 

The name of our county is Wicklow

This means ‘Viking Meadow’.

 

The Vikings were fierce warriors

who came to Ireland 

from countries to the North 

from 795 AD

 

In the 1800s the sailors who sailed past

our coastland would call it ‘The Grey Stones’.

They would say

‘There was a storm at the Greystones’,

or ‘There was good fishing at The Greystones’.

This is how our town got its name.

 

The name of our school is Saint Brigid’s.

She was born over fifteen hundred years ago!

But people remember her because

she was good to the poor, the sick and the old.

February 1st is her Feast Day

 

Welcoming Visitors to Ireland; What we think you should see!

5

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in Blogging Buddies, The World Around Us, Wonderful Wicklow | Posted on January 9, 2015

 

To Visitors to Our Blog,

 

Thank you for visiting us :)

We are from Ireland.

Did you know that Ireland is an island?

Our closest neighbour is Great Britain.

Ireland is in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Europe sept. 1938
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Erik Daugaard via Compfight 

You will see from this map that Ireland

is the third largest island in Europe.

Iceland is the largest island in Europe.

Can you guess what is the second largest island?

(Hint: It is our nearest neighbour.)

 

Ireland is the twentieth largest island in the world.

Australia is the largest island in the world.

 

Ireland is divided up into 32 counties

(like states in the USA).

26 of these are in the south of Ireland

and 6 are in the north.

Killruddery.jpg

We live in the County of Wicklow.

It’s nickname is ‘The Garden of Ireland’

because it is pretty.

 

Wicklow is on the east coast of Ireland.

We live 39 kilometres south of Dublin.

Dublin is our capital city.

O'Connell Bridge
Photo Credit: Tobias Abel via Compfight

Dublin, is our largest city.

There are 859,976 people living in Dublin.

 

There are 4.5 million people living in Ireland.

Ireland is 84,421 km squared.

Ireland would fit into the USA

120 times approximately.

 inishowen light
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Janek Kloss via Compfight

The most northern part of mainland Ireland

is the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal.

It lies at latitude 55.38ºN.

The most southern part is  Mizen Head.

It lies at latitude 51.45ºN

Mizen Head
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Dave Brookes via Compfight

The most easterly point is the Ards Peninsula,

County Down at longitude 5.43ºW.

Dingle & Peninsula, Ireland
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Andree & Edward via Compfight

The most westerly point is on the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry.

It lies at longitude 10.51ºW.

People joke and say that the next stopping point is the USA

(which it is, over the sea!)

Carrauntoohil, Killarney
Photo Credit: ritesh3 via Compfight

Our highest mountain is Carrantuohill, County Kerry,

which is 1,041 metres above sea level.

Carrick on Shannon
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Michael Hanisch via Compfight

The longest river in Ireland is the River Shannon  (386 km) 

Lough Neagh (396 km²) is our largest lake.

Powerscourt Waterfall
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: safahmy via Compfight

We live near Ireland’s tallest waterfall.

Powerscourt Waterfall is in County Wicklow.

The water falls 106 metres.

 

However there are three places in Ireland

that we think you definitely should see.

One is the Giant’s Causeway.

Giants causeway.
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Martina (Tina) via Compfight

The Giant’s Causeway  resulted from

the eruption of a volcano in ancient times.

It is a very interesting formation of

40,000 basalt columns that fit together

as if a giant had laid them down.

Lots of tourists visit the Giant’s Causeway.

You can read a legend about how it got its name here.

68.jpg

Then there is the Greystones Bear

Mrs.Mooney's shop

and last but not least is Mrs. Mooney’s sweet shop.

Her sweet shop is beside our school.

Céad míle fáilte romhat (100,000 welcomes) to ‘The Garden of Ireland’.

1

Posted by merrybeau | Posted in The World Around Us, Wonderful Wicklow | Posted on January 6, 2015

We believe that we live in the most beautiful county in Ireland :)

Take a look at this breathtaking footage from ‘Skycam Ireland’

It was photographed from a drone.

We feel lucky to live in such a beautiful part of the world.